make up natural cara make up make up tutorial make up korea make up minimalis make up artis make up mata belajar make up make up wardah alat make up makeup forever indonesia makeup artist jakarta tips make up barbie make up natural make up make up wajah make up pesta make up syahrini makeup mata makeup minimalis peralatan make up make up cantik make up mac make up kit jual make up make up sederhana perlengkapan make up gambar make up vidio make up cara makeup minimalis wardah make up make up pac make up glamour cara memakai makeup make up panggung harga make up make up modern make up alami make up dasar pixy make up make up muslimah make up oriflame make up jepang makeover cosmetic make up ultima make up sariayu grosir make up makeup fantasi makeup pesta tas makeup langkah make up make up pria make up malam alat makeup tahapan make up produk make up shading make up mak up make up kebaya make up jilbab make up inez make up simpel contoh make up cara ber makeup makeup wajah tanpa make up make up terbaru toko make up mac makeup indonesia make up soft urutan make up trik make up makeover makeup brand gusnaldi make up paket make up panduan make up jual makeup brush make up bagus alat2 make up make up gusnaldi aplikasi make up alat alat makeup dasar make up inez make up peralatan makeup make up wanita make up berjilbab make up tebal sejarah make up make up maybeline make up branded make up siang tata cara makeup reseller make up make up muslim make up maybelin warna make up tips make up artist rias make up make up mata make up artis belajar make up make up artist kursus make up kuas make up make up forever indonesia jual make up mac indonesia make up make up artist indonesia harga make up forever jual make up online make up pac make up forever jakarta make up oriflame jual make up forever make up online shop indonesia harga make up sekolah make up grosir make up harga make up maybelline jual make up murah make up terbaru mak up mac make up indonesia sofia make up make up kit murah mac makeup indonesia produk make up jual make up kit make up store indonesia make up forever academy jakarta toko make up online jual make up set jual make up mac make up beauty jual make up branded produk make up mac make up forever harga make up mac indonesia produk make up artis jual make up palette produk make up forever make up palette murah before after make up pengantin before after make up sendiri before n after hasil makeup contoh make up karakter contoh riasan pengantin before n after harga make up wisuda harga make up artist harga make up forever make up wisuda rias wisuda di jogja Daftar harga make up forever daftar harga make up mac daftar harga kosmetik make up forever makeup wisuda harga makeup wisuda kursus make up di yogyakarta kursus make up di jogja kursus make up jogja kursus make up yogyakarta kursus kecantikan di yogyakarta kursus kecantikan di jogja kursus make up artist di jogja kursus rias pengantin di jogja kursus rias di yogyakarta kursus tata rias di yogyakarta rias pengantin muslim jogja jasa kreasi jilbab wisuda yogyakarta jasa rias make up wisuda murah bagus bisa dpanggil tempat make uf di jigja yang bagus rias wisuda murah dan berkualitas yogyakarta pakar kreasi jilbab di jogja make uper natural yogya make up wisuda hijab area jogja make up dan kreasi jilbab yang bagus di jogja jasa make up natural untuk wisuda jogja makeup jogja make up jogja makeup yogyakarta make up yogyakarta makeup wisuda jogja make up wisuda jogja make up wisuda yogyakarta makeup wisuda yogyakarta
Sunday September 25, 2022
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: could use some wisdom!

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 00:21 #46

  • dave murray
  • dave murray's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Very Senior Member
  • Posts: 882
  • Thank you received: 5
  • Karma: 0
michaelgalik wrote:
My plan is to charge a little less than the going rate to get clients. Around here its 80$ so I’m thinking ill charge 60$ and 30$ for trims. Once I get 20 steady horses will start charging 70$ to new clients and knocking off trouble horses. Then when my name gets out there I can charge the same for all. This way I can get my name out there and get clients quicker! (In theory).

Another plan is to call every farrier I can think of and ask for an apprentaship. Then hope they throw overflow clients my way?

Or maybe I can do both????

Michael, don't labell yourself as a cheap shoer. charge the going rate and do good clean work, show up on time and service your customers, once you are known as a cheap shoer it's hard to overcome that reputation.
When you raise your prices they will just find a more experienced farrier for the same money , or get the next cheap guy that comes along.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 00:39 #47

  • Jack Evers
  • Jack Evers's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 3399
  • Thank you received: 45
  • Karma: 9
charge the going rate and do good clean work, show up on time and service your customers

I remember a young man some years ago that was starting out on the front range of Colorado. He told me there were a multitude of really good and experienced shoers there and he couldn't compete on the quality of his work (he can today), but he could compete on service. Don't over schedule, be on time (call if you will be late) and do the best work you can.

Seemed like good advice for someone starting out.
Jack Evers CJF AFA#426

The best things about the good old days -- I wasn't good and I wasn't old.

The older I get, the more horses I shoe, the fewer things that I can absolutely, positively fix.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 00:52 #48

  • George Geist
  • George Geist's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 3336
  • Thank you received: 3
  • Karma: 3
michaelgalik wrote:
i heard that story in that movie....2012....! so the consensis is that im wrong?? ok... i should beg a farrier around here to ride allong with... i get that that great for learning new things!! but i dont see how that makes money!!
Nobody said it did. If money is your only motivator I'd suggest plenty of other occupations. Peddling junk bonds down on Wall St comes to mind:rolleyes:
George
For another fun place to play........
www.horseshoersforum.invisionzone.com
Come over and say hello.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 00:54 #49

  • Rachael Kane
  • Rachael Kane's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Very Senior Member
  • Posts: 536
  • Thank you received: 10
  • Karma: 5
Quote: That´s the tricky part. when I finally found the money in shoeing , I had over 40,000€ debt. but then again, now I just have some payments for my van and a mortcage.

So glad I'm not the only one Juhani! Sometimes I feel like being a farrier is a very expensive hobbie!! It's only my faith that I can be a good one that keeps me hanging in there.

To the OP, I can totally understand your frustration but you ARE getting good advice. The truth is that you DO NOT MAKE MONEY IN ANY BUSINESS FOR THE FIRST 2 YEARS. You spend far more than you make. So ride with another farrier for free, do what trims you can at a reasonable price and get a part time job on the side to pay the bills.

Back to your original question about how to find customers, think laterally, do lots of different things, if each approach gets you a few more customers you are doing well. I recently made a youtube video of hoofcare tips and sent an email around to all the clubs within an hour radius to forward on to their members. Some did, some suggested I advertise in their newsletter (which I also did begrudgingly:rolleyes:), some ignored me. I got maybe 12 new customers and still might get more so I think that was worth it and it was quite fun.

I'm putting a general news story in the paper this week about not having to be a big strong bloke to shoe horses. I figure this will catch some attention and there are at least as many potential customers not in clubs as there are in clubs so the local paper is a way to reach them.

There are so many inventive ways you can get the message out. Maybe you need to write that business plan and brainstorm some marketing ideas. Empty your cup and get out of your rut of thinking you are going to get off easy somehow, there is so much work ahead of you it's scary!
Rachael :)
CF

'Motivation gets you going, discipline keeps you going.' (Jim Ryan).
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 01:57 #50

The level of excitement you're feeling now will hopefully see you through the next couple of years.

I didn't quit my previous job until it was clear that hoof jobs required most of my time. So while I was building my hoof business, I was weaning off being a horse trainer/riding instructor. It was a nice transition for me even though it meant disapointing students.
“Think for yourself and question authority” ~Timothy Leary~

Benjamin Franklin was often quoted as saying "it is the first responsibility of every citizen to question authority."

“You can tell whether a man is clever by his answers. You can tell...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 05:18 #51

  • Mark_Gough
  • Mark_Gough's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 2184
  • Thank you received: 35
  • Karma: 7
michaelgalik wrote:
i heard that story in that movie....2012....! so the consensis is that im wrong?? ok... i should beg a farrier around here to ride allong with... i get that that great for learning new things!! but i dont see how that makes money!!

It is unlikely that you are going to generate much income immediately following school and certainly not while you are still invested in that endeavor.

Starting with a few trims has big advantages. Errors you may make are more forgiving and the potential variations in skill requirements are few as compared to shoeing. It is, in short, a safer approach while you develop your skills in the fire, under the horse and through continuing academics.

Riding along with farriers is not begging nor is it working for free. Your pay comes in the form of hands-on education, exposure to variations in equine problems and specific solutions and exposure to the various client personalities and work environments you will encounter. Your initial contribution may well prove more a liability than an asset to the farrier so behave accordingly and demonstrate both respect and humility while learning all that you can.

While you'll certainly earn some level of income in the first year or two, you'll do well if it covers your expenses, let alone return any serious profit. Such is the nature of most new businesses. A general rule of thumb is that it takes at least five years to build any successful business. More time is not uncommon. You may have to fill that gap with other employment while pursuing growth in your business.

While advertising can help you acquire new clients, be cautious that your clients needs do not overwhelm your skill and experience. It takes a lot of clients to develop a credible reputation in this industry. It only takes a few bad experiences to wreck that reputation before you get a good start.

Avoid the big show barns. One lamed horse in that environment can ruin you before you start. Focus on the backyard horses that represent small risks and need only basic trimming and/or shoeing. Local 4H horses can represent fair opportunities while you build your skills.

Keep your advertising "low-key". A few business cards passed out to equine owning acquaintances, local 4H clubs and perhaps a few at the local feed stores.

Your first clients are unlikely to be "quality" clients. You'll pick up a lot of "one-offs" and hopefully some overflow from other farriers. That's okay. It will be give you an opportunity to develop your skills at reasonably low risk while quietly building a small client base.

Working with other farriers is critical. Do it often! Develop a good working relationship with them and any veterinarians you may engage. You'll find that a lot of early customer opportunities come from those resources. They will also prove to be your best local educational resource. Never be afraid to pass off a client that requires skills greater than you have achieved. It helps other farriers to recognize that you understand your own limits and will assist you in building a reputation of integrity with them. In return, they'll likely send a few easier ones your way when they are overbooked.

Attend every clinic, seminar and convention you can. These are incredible networking opportunities and usually represent development opportunities you may not have access to locally. Join the AFA and your local AFA chapter. It's another networking and educational opportunity. If there are other farrier associations/groups in your area, join them and become an active participant.

The pursuit of education will help in meeting your business and academic development needs. That education will expose you to others in the trade that may occasionally offer a "leg up", either through skill development or client referrals.

Get to know trainers and any lay dentists, equine chiropractors or massage therapists in your area. Exchange business cards with them and let them know you are trying to build your business. If you encounter a client that can benefit from those trade professionals, make the recommendation. They'll likely return the favor.

Set aside several hours per week for "home work", both academic and hands-on in the forge and, if available, under your own horses.

Identify price ranges for other farriers in your area and set your own fees in the middle to upper middle of that range. Don't give discounts for multiple horses of mini's/ponies. Stick to your price schedule and justify it through quality business relationships with your customers and a commitment to constantly improving your service level. You need those other farriers to help you with your business development. Severely under-cutting prices is not going to serve as an incentive to convince your competitors to assist you. Compete with quality workmanship and service, not price!

Charity work has value. While trimming a few neglect cases for the humane society or a local rescue may not generate income, it does make your name known to people in that environment. They may have horses of their own or acquaintances who are owners and will want your service in the future.

Develop a method for managing your books, financial and scheduling. Take before and after photos of all new client horses for a baseline. This gives you a method to go back later and measure your own work for improvement areas.

When you get a client, deliver the absolute best quality you can and make sure to ask that client if they want to participate on a regular schedule. "One-offs" are great for quick income but you'll need repeat customers to build any kind of forecasting into your annual budget.

Give every new client a business card! Carry a receipt book and make sure your contact information is on the customers copy of the receipt. Make sure the receipt includes next appointment information.

Call every client, even those with already confirmed appointments, one week in advance to re-confirm specific date and time. Allow a + or - 15 minute of arrival time and make sure the customer is okay with that window of time.

Be careful of scheduling clients "back-to-back". One problem horse can set you back and cause you to be late for the next. Always call a client if you are going to be more than 15 minutes late.

While you are just starting out you have one huge advantage over your competitors. They are probably well booked and generally work normal business hours during the week. Since you are new and willing to "go the extra mile", offer services in the evenings and weekends when a lot of other farriers are unavailable. Let clients know you do not charge a "farm call" fee or extra fees for evening, weekend or emergency work (at least for now).

Never hit a clients horse! If the animal needs discipline, let the owner do it. While a subtle and gentle "bump" may occasionally be needed to help focus the animal, always presume the owner likes their horse better than you and will not tolerate any physical "abuse" of their baby.

Talk to your clients. Tell them that if they have any questions about your work to feel free to ask. If you are comparatively young, always address an adult client as Mr., Miss, or Mrs. as appropriate. When done, ask them if they have any questions or concerns and make sure to let them know you appreciate their business.

Never speak poorly of another farrier, regardless any personal feelings you may harbor. It is nearly impossible to speak poorly of another without appearing so yourself to the listener.

Never speak poorly of another horse owner or barn owner/manager in the presence of a client. You don't know who they know or who they talk to. You also don't know who they may someday meet.

Put a plan on paper. Plot your growth expectations in monthly revenue and set an expectation to meet that goal. Document your continuing educational needs (clinics, seminars, etc) and commit to meeting those needs.

Have a problem horse? Ask a more experienced farrier to help you out and let the client know you are calling in someone with more experience. The client will respect you for it and so will the attending farrier. Give that farrier the service fee in exchange for the education and the opportunity it gives you to do a better job on that horse in the future.

Remember that of all the equine trades, the farrier probably has more regular contact with a horse owner than any other trade professional except perhaps a barn owner. They will see you every six to eight weeks for years to come. They'll look to you for advice well outside the scope of the farrier. You'll hear questions about nutrition, illnesses, riding, horsemanship, showing, grooming and just about anything else you can imagine. Be careful to avoid sharing information that is out of your area of expertise. Owners will hold you responsible if you are wrong. Defer questions as appropriate to the owners veterinarian or other trade professional.

How are you going to make money? By delivering excellence in workmanship and quality service that speeds the "word-of-mouth" advertising so prevalent in this business. By establishing a reputation for professionalism; developing a solid network of competitive associates and conducting yourself in an ethical manner in all aspects of the business. By taking responsibility for your mistakes and making every effort to put things right. By waking up every morning and telling yourself, "I know I can work harder, learn more and do better than I did yesterday".

Your greatest challenge will come when you finally realize that "You don't know what you don't know yet". That realization is a humbling experience. It's also when good things start to happen.

Finally... join the Farrier & Hoofcare Resource Center co-op program. It supports this forum and is a more than reasonable investment in return for the educational, networking, benefits and business opportunities provided here.

Best luck and cheers,
Mark
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 06:56 #52

  • Bill Adams
  • Bill Adams's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 4185
  • Thank you received: 9
  • Karma: 6
michaelgalik wrote:
A service that markets a profit is a successful business. I am willing to lower my cost in order to make my name known and to increase my client list!! Is this a bad business strategy?

Don't come into this as a way to make money. This is a lifestyle. I get to shoe horses. I get to do them better than the last time. I think it is crazy the amount of money people pay me to have the fun I do. As a responsible husband and father, I will tweak my business to make it even more profitable, turns out that's fun too.
Coming into this, don't plan on making money enough to live on for a while. Get a night job. Get another night job. Suffer. How can you have great stories to tell about all the hardships you had when you were young if you don't have hardships?
Yeah, you need to beg the Farriers in your area to work for them for free. They will teach you and encourage you and send clients your way.
Or you could ask their clients to stab them in the back for $20 and see where that gets you.

A rightous man regardeth the life of his beast. Proverbs 12:10
I don't give a damn for a man who can only spell a word one way. Mark Twain
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 09:47 #53

Rachel is correct few succed in business as you dont make money for a couple of years and things really dont strat to go till the 5 year point. At 7 you are really cooking and at 10 years you are well established.

My first 2 years I worked 3 part time jobs to pay the mortgage and fit shoeing appointents around them. By year 5 I had only one part time job. By 6-7 I had only my farrier business.

It takes great drive and determination to be in business for ones self.
George Spear
CNBBT, CNBF, CLS


".....and I said to the horse: Trust no man in whose eyes you do not see yourself reflected as an equal."
Don Vincenzo Giobbe
CA. 1700

"What people do not appreciate is that every time a horse submits to...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 12:17 #54

  • reillyshoe
  • reillyshoe's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 2690
  • Thank you received: 7
  • Karma: 4
michaelgalik wrote:
i heard that story in that movie....2012....! so the consensis is that im wrong?? ok... i should beg a farrier around here to ride allong with... i get that that great for learning new things!! but i dont see how that makes money!!

It will make you a better farrier, which will make you more money in the long term. Attending college does not make you money in the short term (in fact it cost you quite a bit), but in the long term a college education can be a good investment. I think you should apply the same logic to your farrier education- take a long term view.

Someone should start a thread on the jobs which got us through the firt five years of a shoeing career. I found a picture of my farrier class, and I believe I was the only graduate who was still shoeing after 5 years. Farrier schools in the US are very cursory, and (for the most part) will not provide you with the skills necessary to immediately step out into the community and start a successful business on your own.
P
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 15:58 #55

  • michaelgalik
  • michaelgalik's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Contributing Member
  • Posts: 53
  • Karma: 0
This post has been great, thank you for all your input. It puts me onto a direction of expectation. I am not looking to be a farrier full time hoping for 20 horses. I have been waiting for my background investigation to go threw for federal employment and have used this spare time to learn about a new trade. And believe me... I am in the hard times of my life. Plenty of stories and plenty of bills. No one had to post here and all did with great direction. None of your comments went unheard.... thank you all for your time and knowledge...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 25 Sep 2010 23:34 #56

  • Bill Adams
  • Bill Adams's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 4185
  • Thank you received: 9
  • Karma: 6
michaelgalik wrote:
I have been waiting for my background investigation to go threw for federal employment
Don't let 'em know you associate with this crowd.

A rightous man regardeth the life of his beast. Proverbs 12:10
I don't give a damn for a man who can only spell a word one way. Mark Twain
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 27 Sep 2010 01:46 #57

ladyblacksmith wrote:


You need to go to as many clinics on the subject as possible; and you need to apprentice with some one for at least 3 years and then go an apprentice with others doing more specialized shoeing work. You will have to invest on at least 5 years of your time into this trade and profession;

before you go out on your own and shoes horses and take money from others!!!!!!!!!!!

Good start is getting involved with the World Championship Blacksmiths organizations and go to the hammer-in's and practice and practice your forging skills; and then consectively; I would go for the AFA and practice for some type of cert. ect., and go to as many of their clinics on hand as I could; if not doing racehorses and joining our Union of Journeyman Horseshoers.

That is how you become profient in this trade and get very good at forging work and your shoeing work. Then you can get good clientelle that will pay you for your professional shoeing work.


Anyone else want to comment? ........on my suggestions?

Linda Muggleworth, IUJH

Worth repeating
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 27 Sep 2010 06:21 #58

  • Rachael Kane
  • Rachael Kane's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Very Senior Member
  • Posts: 536
  • Thank you received: 10
  • Karma: 5
I think we scared him off :cool:
Rachael :)
CF

'Motivation gets you going, discipline keeps you going.' (Jim Ryan).
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 27 Sep 2010 09:33 #59

Rachael Kane wrote:
I think we scared him off :cool:

He seemed to already know everything anyway.
George Spear
CNBBT, CNBF, CLS


".....and I said to the horse: Trust no man in whose eyes you do not see yourself reflected as an equal."
Don Vincenzo Giobbe
CA. 1700

"What people do not appreciate is that every time a horse submits to...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:could use some wisdom! 27 Sep 2010 19:32 #60

  • michaelgalik
  • michaelgalik's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Contributing Member
  • Posts: 53
  • Karma: 0
hey now... there has been allot of accusations here.. your opinions are a side of this business that no one really talks about. (or at least that ive ever heard.) ive never claimed to knowing it all. relax here were just talkin.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Kunena Birthday Module

  • clearhillsfarrier birthday is today
  • Creager7850 birthday is today
  • lindar131 birthday is today
  • Dennis Peveto birthday is in 1 day
  • ironmanhorseshoeing birthday is in 1 day
  • Robyn Beane birthday is in 1 day
  • vanderblij birthday is in 1 day
  • Viking farrier birthday is in 1 day
  • newyearsbaby05 birthday is in 363 days
  • Rancho JD birthday is in 364 days
  • Tony Dunagan birthday is in 364 days
Time to create page: 0.232 seconds

S5 Box

Register

*
*
*
*
*
*

Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required.