make up natural cara make up make up tutorial make up korea make up minimalis make up artis make up mata belajar make up make up wardah alat make up makeup forever indonesia makeup artist jakarta tips make up barbie make up natural make up make up wajah make up pesta make up syahrini makeup mata makeup minimalis peralatan make up make up cantik make up mac make up kit jual make up make up sederhana perlengkapan make up gambar make up vidio make up cara makeup minimalis wardah make up make up pac make up glamour cara memakai makeup make up panggung harga make up make up modern make up alami make up dasar pixy make up make up muslimah make up oriflame make up jepang makeover cosmetic make up ultima make up sariayu grosir make up makeup fantasi makeup pesta tas makeup langkah make up make up pria make up malam alat makeup tahapan make up produk make up shading make up mak up make up kebaya make up jilbab make up inez make up simpel contoh make up cara ber makeup makeup wajah tanpa make up make up terbaru toko make up mac makeup indonesia make up soft urutan make up trik make up makeover makeup brand gusnaldi make up paket make up panduan make up jual makeup brush make up bagus alat2 make up make up gusnaldi aplikasi make up alat alat makeup dasar make up inez make up peralatan makeup make up wanita make up berjilbab make up tebal sejarah make up make up maybeline make up branded make up siang tata cara makeup reseller make up make up muslim make up maybelin warna make up tips make up artist rias make up make up mata make up artis belajar make up make up artist kursus make up kuas make up make up forever indonesia jual make up mac indonesia make up make up artist indonesia harga make up forever jual make up online make up pac make up forever jakarta make up oriflame jual make up forever make up online shop indonesia harga make up sekolah make up grosir make up harga make up maybelline jual make up murah make up terbaru mak up mac make up indonesia sofia make up make up kit murah mac makeup indonesia produk make up jual make up kit make up store indonesia make up forever academy jakarta toko make up online jual make up set jual make up mac make up beauty jual make up branded produk make up mac make up forever harga make up mac indonesia produk make up artis jual make up palette produk make up forever make up palette murah before after make up pengantin before after make up sendiri before n after hasil makeup contoh make up karakter contoh riasan pengantin before n after harga make up wisuda harga make up artist harga make up forever make up wisuda rias wisuda di jogja Daftar harga make up forever daftar harga make up mac daftar harga kosmetik make up forever makeup wisuda harga makeup wisuda kursus make up di yogyakarta kursus make up di jogja kursus make up jogja kursus make up yogyakarta kursus kecantikan di yogyakarta kursus kecantikan di jogja kursus make up artist di jogja kursus rias pengantin di jogja kursus rias di yogyakarta kursus tata rias di yogyakarta rias pengantin muslim jogja jasa kreasi jilbab wisuda yogyakarta jasa rias make up wisuda murah bagus bisa dpanggil tempat make uf di jigja yang bagus rias wisuda murah dan berkualitas yogyakarta pakar kreasi jilbab di jogja make uper natural yogya make up wisuda hijab area jogja make up dan kreasi jilbab yang bagus di jogja jasa make up natural untuk wisuda jogja makeup jogja make up jogja makeup yogyakarta make up yogyakarta makeup wisuda jogja make up wisuda jogja make up wisuda yogyakarta makeup wisuda yogyakarta
Tuesday September 27, 2022
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2

TOPIC: Prospective clients, first conversation.

Prospective clients, first conversation. 06 Aug 2010 05:14 #1

  • Joey Aczon
  • Joey Aczon's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 1937
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
I was thinking it might be a good idea to share for some of us to share how we handle phone calls (or in person queries) from prostective new clients. I think this would be helpful for some of the new guys as well as the rest of us.

I tend to get 3 different types of calls from new clients. Of course there are price hunters, people seeking better/higher level of service, and refferals.

Price hunters tend to go as such, "Hello, I need to get my horses shoed, how much do you charge"

"Well that depends on where you are located, what kind of horses you have, and what their intended use is, but within my normal service area I charge $100 for a full reset for all equines up to a size 5, with new plain steel shoes it's $120"

"Oh wow, he's just a trail horse, is it really that much for a trail horse?"

"Yes ma'am, it's "just" $120 for a trail horse."

*click*

Don't worry about price hunters, if they happen to hire you do the work and collect payment. They are the very bottom rung of horse owner, they generally don't care about quality, you could do the best job they've ever seen and they'll still ditch you to save $5 next time.

Owners trying to upgrade service upgrade for 2 reasons most common is simply having an unreliable farrier, and the other is trying to fix a problem. Lameness, cracks, distortion, stumbling, gait faults, interferance etc...

The best thing to do for someone with an unreliable farrier is simply present yourself as a professional and move on. Don't dwell on the issue, go on too long and they are likely to think you're lying.

If they have some hoof related problems, try not to diagnose the horse over the phone. If they knew enough about the problem to explain it accurately enough for you to diagnose it over the phone, they probably wouldn't need to seek out a new farrier to help them. It's best to speak in general terms and tell them you need to see the horse before you can really offer any solutions. A good example would be telling an owner that true cracks are generally an issue of balance and weight distribution, althogh there are other potential factors so you would need to see the horse.

Then there are refferals, they generally will fall into the above catagories, but you have added benefit of being a refferal, and knowing whom they associate with.

In your first coversation with any kind of client there is a point where you get to ask questions and make sure it's even something you want to do. Always ask the horses location, breed, age, discipline, and level of work. You also need to know the horses level of soundness and if any pads or special orthodics are necessary.

I generally make it a point to tell them how much I charge if they haven't asked yet. I give them a price for reset with new shoes, and make sure to specify that it's for plain steel shoes. Then I ask them if they are aware of any orthodics the horse needs other plain steel shoe that I need to be aware of. Try not to get into specifics with an owner as they are not likely to know unless there have been some previous lameness issues or corrective measures taken. Asking about aluminum shoes, rocker toes, rim shoes etc is likely to confuse or even embarass an owner. Instead just say "My standard is ______, would you like or prefer something different so I know what to prepare for."

Hopefully some others will offer their ideas as well, and someone will get some use from this.
Joey Aczon

Over-specialize and breed in weakness... It's slow death. :cool:

"I never make the mistake of arguing with people for whose opinions I have no respect." — Gibbon
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 06 Aug 2010 10:42 #2

Referalls are your best bet.

Ads draw price shoppers but also dangerous horses.

In order to stay safe its critical to indentify 2 sub-catagories that may be replying to an advertisment.

First the new clueless horse owner. Quiz them to make sure they are the type that can follow instructions and dont mind paying for time spent training their horse and you can steer them and their horses into becomming excellent clients.

Second owners of dangerous horses who have been fired by other farriers and will not take direction. My rule is keep them on the phone and let them do the talking. If you ask questions they will lie about how great darling fluffy bunny horsie is for the farrier. If you leave silence they will fill it with the information you need to stay safe.
George Spear
CNBBT, CNBF, CLS


".....and I said to the horse: Trust no man in whose eyes you do not see yourself reflected as an equal."
Don Vincenzo Giobbe
CA. 1700

"What people do not appreciate is that every time a horse submits to...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 08 Aug 2010 08:25 #3

  • Peters Shoeing
  • Peters Shoeing's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 496
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: 0
You and I have the same style format. I sometimes forget to ask everything, so I'm getting better at it. Ideally, I ask some questions about the condition, any lameness issues, type of work-load or discipline, currently in shoes or not, and it goes from there. They tell me what they think they need and I tell them any other recommendations in person. However, I have discussed shoes with barefooters on the phone and I sometimes think it is important to bring up, especially for a horse with a high work load. I never speak in absolutes though. "Your horses may benefit from shoes considering that type of work...I would be happy to trim and evaluate your horses' needs". Open-ended, not pushy. Discuss more in person.

I guess you could say I dont ask them about extras or therapuetics, bc I find it confuses them, unless they ask me. If they want to know about pads, vettec, bar or synthetic shoes, they will ask. That's my opinion on it. When you discuss these things you sound like a salesman and you can embarrass the client on their limited knowledge. Let the details come out in person, but mention that you charge additionally for special applications and you have a few in mind for a problem of that nature. If they need a baseline price for special services, you can say, "I am unable to say what is needed for certain, but to give you an example, I sometimes use _______ to achieve relief for that problem and I charge ____ for that, however I may have other options available to you and I will know more when I come see your horse."

For non-standard cases, I think it's best to always end most conversations with...."but I would have to come out and see your horse to really know what options are available".

I also make sure they know to be there the first time and that their horses need to be caught and ready for me. Politely. Can't go catching their horses all around the property. Did it once. Once was enough. ;)
Alan Peters
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 08 Aug 2010 17:34 #4

  • solidrockshoer
  • solidrockshoer's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Admin
  • Posts: 12874
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: -1
90% of work is refferals, someone will have recommended you. Very few people here ring someone out of the phonebook unless they are desperate. As long as you provide reliablity, decent standard of work and dont beat the horses up your book will fill very quickly and then you can be the one to be picky and make them convince you why you should take them on as a client.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 08 Aug 2010 18:41 #5

  • smitty88
  • smitty88's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Guru
  • Posts: 6951
  • Thank you received: 64
  • Karma: 13
First question were are you
next who was your last farrier
i think you know the next 2
Smitty88
John Mc Loughlin
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 08 Aug 2010 19:43 #6

  • Peters Shoeing
  • Peters Shoeing's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 496
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: 0
Was wondering how you guys tackle these questions...they are important, but so is your method of asking them.

1.) Who was your last farrier...? (I sometimes ask instead, "were you working with another farrier previously? If so, what was your treatment plan?" I do not ask for names.)
It leads into why they no longer work together...an important question, but is also a bit unprofessional to ask, no? Well, here you may get some info on the horse's behavior and the client's downfalls...some clients are known for price-shopping every few months, not keeping a schedule, lying about their horse's temperament, wanting barefoot trims to avoid paying for shoes (even with a lame horse), or asking you to price-match.:eek:


2.) Do you keep a regular hoof maintence program?
If they openly state that it has been 8+ weeks since their last trim and their horse is in pain, I tell them I usally charge a bit extra for the additional time it will take me for overdue horses, but it's a small fee.
I havent charged anyone extra yet however because I rarely find cases like that. If it comes up, I just explain that if they dont keep a regular schedule with me, I will have to charge for overdue services. Like I said, I havent done this yet. I know this is a quick way to lose backyard-horse clients and I still need them. :o

3.) How did you come to find me?
Seems like a harmless question and it usually is. On one other hand, like someone said above, it instantly gives clues on the type of client that referred them. This groups people together and it isn't always an accurate picture. The behavior of the old client who referred the new client is sometimes independant of the new client and has nothing to do with anything. YOU can only make assumptions here and it's better you didnt. This stuff naturally comes out in person, so IMO, get the info there.

My two cents. What are yours?
Alan Peters
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 08 Aug 2010 20:11 #7

  • smitty88
  • smitty88's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Guru
  • Posts: 6951
  • Thank you received: 64
  • Karma: 13
alan whats with all the questions
Smitty88
John Mc Loughlin
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 09 Aug 2010 00:02 #8

  • Joey Aczon
  • Joey Aczon's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 1937
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Man, I really should have been asleep instead of posting. More than a few typos there eh? LOL

The biggest question I ask is "Who was your previous farrier, and why are you looking to change?" I don't think it's unprofessional at all. If I know the farrier I will usually call them and chat about the client. If the owner has bad horses, owes them money, or bounces checks I may decide I don't want to work for them either.

Owners treat you better if they know you are connected, and communicate with other local farriers, trainers, etc. I had a guy last month that owes me money, he tried to jump to another farrier, didn't work. It was a great feeling when the owner called me screaming because I called around to the other gaited guys and had him blacklisted. "How dare you drag my name through the mud like that!" He still hasn't paid me though.
Peters Shoeing wrote:
That's my opinion on it. When you discuss these things you sound like a salesman and you can embarrass the client on their limited knowledge. Let the details come out in person, but mention that you charge additionally for special applications and you have a few in mind for a problem of that nature.

Its funny, because your thread about being turned away is what prompted me to start this thread. When you said the owner was confused about Al, Fe, Ti over the phone, I imagined that you probably could have saved that confusion by just not asking. That's why I wanted to share my format.

Given the way you present yourself online where you have time to think and edit what you say, I can only imagine your communication skills in person or over the phone.

Lack of organization or poor preparation only leads to low confidence in yourself. Low confidence or self esteem is a poor selling point.
Joey Aczon

Over-specialize and breed in weakness... It's slow death. :cool:

"I never make the mistake of arguing with people for whose opinions I have no respect." — Gibbon
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 09 Aug 2010 04:14 #9

  • Peters Shoeing
  • Peters Shoeing's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 496
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: 0
Smitty, those questions or other ways of getting that type of info is important as it can save a headache in certain situations, alluded to by Joey and Dances. I dont ask them all too often and I was wondering if anyone here does and how they go about it.

"When you said the owner was confused about Al, Fe, Ti over the phone, I imagined that you probably could have saved that confusion by just not asking."

I think you misunderstood. I didnt ask. He did. And, I explained. It came up when I asked whether his horse's were currently shod and how they were doing, etc. He then asked about metals.

"Given the way you present yourself online where you have time to think and edit what you say, I can only imagine your communication skills in person or over the phone."

How did we go from client dialogue suggestions to this? Lack of preparation- What the hell does that even mean? Yep, I didnt finance a rig. Does it make me less confident in my abilities? Hate to break it to you, it doesn't. Does it make you less confident in my abilities? Maybe, but what does it have to do with phone-client dialogue?

Not sure why you made this personal. Don't take this the wrong way, but you have not a clue how I discuss business or conduct mysellf among clients and nor do I have a clue on your business handling, but I don't assume and make asinine comments. I was commenting on your post, thought it was helpful, added in my opinions and asked for some feedback. I handle the "previous farrier" question differently than you, and I have a different opinion of it. I was trying to encourage conversation on it because my opinions are not set it stone. My handling a phone call differently than you has nothing to do with my confidence. Man, what a strange day it's been.
Alan Peters
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 09 Aug 2010 05:10 #10

  • Clint Burrell
  • Clint Burrell's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Very Senior Member
  • Posts: 998
  • Thank you received: 7
  • Karma: 2
I ask who the previous farrier is/was. If it's someone I know who does good work, a red flag goes up. If someone I know doesn't do that good of work, price goes up.;)

I also ask,who their vet is, how they got my #, where they're located, if the horses stand:rolleyes:, any problems(the horse not them), when can they be around(not that I'm going to be there to suit them), # of horses, breed, use, and if my tummy don't hurt I ask for directions. If I have a belly ache by this time the I tell them I'm full up but can refer them to a good friend.:p:D
Clint Burrell

"You say your from collage,
but you don't seem to bright.
You just brought a swichblade
to a pistol fight"
Move On by Chris Knight
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 09 Aug 2010 06:27 #11

  • Joey Aczon
  • Joey Aczon's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 1937
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Perhaps I did misunderstand. You made reference to the materials several times as if to make a point. What was the point to bringing it up them? Does his asking about what kind of shoes make him less qualified to turn you away or something?
How did we go from client dialogue suggestions to this? Lack of preparation- What the hell does that even mean? Yep, I didnt finance a rig. Does it make me less confident in my abilities? Hate to break it to you, it doesn't. Does it make you less confident in my abilities? Maybe, but what does it have to do with phone-client dialogue?

Slow your roll there guy. I am just talking about phone client dialogue, notice the title of the thread? I talking about how to handle your first call with a client so that you can get the information you need accurately and without confusing an owner or sounding like you're asking them how you need to shoe their horse. I'm not talking about your "rig" at all, hence the new thread.

You mentioning the Al issue multiple times it tells me that something about it was akward. I don't know if it was him or you or just me being overly analytical when I should have been asleep. In any case, could you have been better prepared to answer his questions, or his response to your rig? That's mostly what I'm getting at.

People generally respond best when their questions are answered in a concise and streamlined manner. I actually rehearse questions I have for clients, answers to questions so that I'm well prepared to respond and can do so assertively, and confidently. Am I prepared for any question that may come at me? No, but I can explain what and why I do every part of my everyday work, and most of my corrective/theraputic work. Being ready and able to explain what your "standards" are, and when you would start to deviate from them. Meaning if I know nothing about a horse, and he's thrown all his shoes so I have nothing to go by, I know what shoes I would start with for a given discipline. I can say "Well let's start here, and see if we need to change anything next time."

How can you be confident in something if you are not prepared to explain it?
Joey Aczon

Over-specialize and breed in weakness... It's slow death. :cool:

"I never make the mistake of arguing with people for whose opinions I have no respect." — Gibbon
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 09 Aug 2010 09:09 #12

  • Peters Shoeing
  • Peters Shoeing's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 496
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: 0
Man, I think I'm being over-analytical too. You caught me off-guard. The whole thing makes me crazy, as evidenced. Sorry about that.

Does his asking about what kind of shoes make him less qualified to turn you away or something?

Yes and no. It's his opinion, he's entitled to that obviously. It was just ridiculous to hear coming from the guy that knows nothing about what his horses' need, but is certain I couldn't either based on a car. Clearly the car is the qualifier here.

you have been better prepared to answer his questions, or his response to your rig? That's mostly what I'm getting at.
You're right. I had nothing to say. I have amped up my response-rolodex since then and made some changes to the layout, some pending. I do agree that my confidence in that situation needed some work. I think he may have continued letting me set-up if I better asserted myself. I took your comment personally, it sounded personal. Ehh. Tired.

I actually rehearse questions I have for clients, answers to questions so that I'm well prepared to respond and can do so assertively, and confidently.
It's nice to know someone else practiced once as well. I am confident in my abilities, but not comfortable with a client judging me on my car. I know now, it's inevitable. It's a work in progress and I found your thread helpful. I'm sure many others do too.

Asking who their vet is...good one to add to the list. Might be probing though. Guess it depends. For lameness issues, yes, I think it's important to ask up front. Otherwise, might be too much at first. ?
Alan Peters
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 09 Aug 2010 13:12 #13

  • Lori McBride
  • Lori McBride's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 202
  • Thank you received: 5
  • Karma: 0
I tend to let the customer do most of the talking. It seems I can get quite a bit of info by just letting them talk. Kinda get a feel for what kind of horses they have, what type of customer they are ect....I do have a few questions that I like to have answered before I go out:

1) Where did you get my name? Although I don't usually have to ask, typically the conversation will start out like this; "Hello,my name is blank and I got your name from so and so ect.....". I don't really advertise so most calls I get are referrals either by current customers or from a couple local vets.

2) What are your reasons for switching farriers? I can word this question in different ways, depending on how the conversation is going. I don't normally ask who the previous farrier was until I get there, unless I'm getting the "vibe".:rolleyes:

3) What is your address and phone number? Pretty basic questions, but definitely need to know! ;-)

4) How many horses? What are their shoeing packages right now etc... I don't ever try to figure out what the horse is going to need over the phone, just like to get an estimate for time allowance. If they ask about certain products/shoeing protocols I will gladly answer or explain but I think in person is much easier.


Most other info I wait until I get there, I won't be able to remember it all anyways, and I don't want to write it down until I know it is accurate. :D

Something I have just started doing (a farrier friend of mine does this) is to fill out a vet type form, (made my own on the computer, then I just keep them all in a three ring) at the first visit I can in an orderly professional way get down all pertinent info. Who the vet is, last farrier, age, breed, discipline, pertinent medical history, ect.....also I have room for notes so I can quick jot down things that I want to keep and eye on or something that I want to try next time or whatever. I have really been liking this system. This is an interesting thread, thanks for posting!
Lori McBride CF
McBride Horseshoeing

_______________________________________________

Don't follow where the path may lead...........go where there is no path and leave a trail.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 09 Aug 2010 16:54 #14

  • Luna butte
  • Luna butte's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Very Senior Member
  • Posts: 556
  • Karma: 0
there is a guy that has owed me money for over a year, and he continues to call me wanting me to come trim up his "parade horse". the fellow is a bit hanicapped so i have been going anyway and taking partial payments from him just to make me feel like i am doing a good deed.

however, the last time i spoke with him i told him that i had quit servicing the area he lives in and gave him Trevor Halls number:D:D

sorry T Hall i just could'nt resist. let me know how it goes.
Justin Hill's Horseshoeing
Goldendale Wa
509-261-1508

http://gorgefarrier.com/

I'm just another guy that play's in a lot of other peoples Poop... for a living I might add
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Prospective clients, first conversation. 09 Aug 2010 18:59 #15

  • Joey Aczon
  • Joey Aczon's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 1937
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
With the weather currently at a "balmy" 95* with a heat index of 103* at a "dry" 47% humidity, I am sitting in my car waiting for a horse with the A/C set to "snowman" I'm reminded to also make sure your work area is well shaded, ventilated, and has power to run a couple fans.

I tried to hot fit my first horse today, and decided they will get along fine without burning the rest of them.
Joey Aczon

Over-specialize and breed in weakness... It's slow death. :cool:

"I never make the mistake of arguing with people for whose opinions I have no respect." — Gibbon
The administrator has disabled public write access.
  • Page:
  • 1
  • 2

Kunena Birthday Module

  • irideazippo birthday is today
  • McCutcheon969 birthday is today
  • RidingGrace birthday is today
  • trueworthy birthday is today
  • 56power65 birthday is in 1 day
  • Brenda-MI birthday is in 1 day
  • farriergodmother birthday is in 1 day
  • Jetikarabbit birthday is in 1 day
  • Myr_4089 birthday is in 1 day
  • texfarrier birthday is in 1 day
  • lindar131 birthday is in 363 days
  • Dennis Peveto birthday is in 364 days
  • ironmanhorseshoeing birthday is in 364 days
  • Robyn Beane birthday is in 364 days
  • vanderblij birthday is in 364 days
Time to create page: 0.227 seconds

S5 Box

Register

*
*
*
*
*
*

Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required.