make up natural cara make up make up tutorial make up korea make up minimalis make up artis make up mata belajar make up make up wardah alat make up makeup forever indonesia makeup artist jakarta tips make up barbie make up natural make up make up wajah make up pesta make up syahrini makeup mata makeup minimalis peralatan make up make up cantik make up mac make up kit jual make up make up sederhana perlengkapan make up gambar make up vidio make up cara makeup minimalis wardah make up make up pac make up glamour cara memakai makeup make up panggung harga make up make up modern make up alami make up dasar pixy make up make up muslimah make up oriflame make up jepang makeover cosmetic make up ultima make up sariayu grosir make up makeup fantasi makeup pesta tas makeup langkah make up make up pria make up malam alat makeup tahapan make up produk make up shading make up mak up make up kebaya make up jilbab make up inez make up simpel contoh make up cara ber makeup makeup wajah tanpa make up make up terbaru toko make up mac makeup indonesia make up soft urutan make up trik make up makeover makeup brand gusnaldi make up paket make up panduan make up jual makeup brush make up bagus alat2 make up make up gusnaldi aplikasi make up alat alat makeup dasar make up inez make up peralatan makeup make up wanita make up berjilbab make up tebal sejarah make up make up maybeline make up branded make up siang tata cara makeup reseller make up make up muslim make up maybelin warna make up tips make up artist rias make up make up mata make up artis belajar make up make up artist kursus make up kuas make up make up forever indonesia jual make up mac indonesia make up make up artist indonesia harga make up forever jual make up online make up pac make up forever jakarta make up oriflame jual make up forever make up online shop indonesia harga make up sekolah make up grosir make up harga make up maybelline jual make up murah make up terbaru mak up mac make up indonesia sofia make up make up kit murah mac makeup indonesia produk make up jual make up kit make up store indonesia make up forever academy jakarta toko make up online jual make up set jual make up mac make up beauty jual make up branded produk make up mac make up forever harga make up mac indonesia produk make up artis jual make up palette produk make up forever make up palette murah before after make up pengantin before after make up sendiri before n after hasil makeup contoh make up karakter contoh riasan pengantin before n after harga make up wisuda harga make up artist harga make up forever make up wisuda rias wisuda di jogja Daftar harga make up forever daftar harga make up mac daftar harga kosmetik make up forever makeup wisuda harga makeup wisuda kursus make up di yogyakarta kursus make up di jogja kursus make up jogja kursus make up yogyakarta kursus kecantikan di yogyakarta kursus kecantikan di jogja kursus make up artist di jogja kursus rias pengantin di jogja kursus rias di yogyakarta kursus tata rias di yogyakarta rias pengantin muslim jogja jasa kreasi jilbab wisuda yogyakarta jasa rias make up wisuda murah bagus bisa dpanggil tempat make uf di jigja yang bagus rias wisuda murah dan berkualitas yogyakarta pakar kreasi jilbab di jogja make uper natural yogya make up wisuda hijab area jogja make up dan kreasi jilbab yang bagus di jogja jasa make up natural untuk wisuda jogja makeup jogja make up jogja makeup yogyakarta make up yogyakarta makeup wisuda jogja make up wisuda jogja make up wisuda yogyakarta makeup wisuda yogyakarta
Tuesday September 27, 2022
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's

Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 31 Oct 2004 17:02 #1

  • Karen B.
  • Karen B.'s Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Contributing Member
  • Posts: 57
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
So, this is what's happening.Since I've been having no luck in being able to find a farrier willing to take on an apprentice,It looks like school is the most obvious choice.However,100% of the farriers I have spoken with consider school as unimportant,you don't really learn until you can apprentice for several years.With that said,If I went to school and expect to still have the need to apprentice what would I do as no one in the area is willing to take on an apprentice.I've been told everything from "I just don't take apprentices" to "I won't ride with a woman,it doesn't LOOK good and my wife won't allow it".If anyone here can reccomend a school,which one would you attend? Any to absolutely stay away from? Any words of wisdom??? Thanks in advance! ~Karen
Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented immigrant"
is like calling a drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist ".
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 31 Oct 2004 18:26 #2

  • Rick Burten
  • Rick Burten's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Enforcer
  • Posts: 9082
  • Thank you received: 50
  • Karma: 8
Going to school first is always the best way to proceed. Deciding which school to attend is the conundrum. These are the ones I have personal knowledge of and am willing to recommend(in no particular order): Heartland Horseshoeing School, Lamar, Mo.; Cornell University, Ithaca, NY; Kentucky Horseshoeing School, Mt. Edens, Ky. I am sure there are others, and perhaps some other farriers will weigh in with their opinions and recommendations.

I think the farriers who have told you that school is unimportant are wrong. You will learn the basics, what the tools are, how to use them, etc. This makes you much more valuable as an apprentice or assistant because you will already have basic knowledge and rudimentary skills. The schools are set up to give you a foundation upon which it will be up to you to build.

Do not make the mistake of attending a two or four week farrier course. It is not nearly long enough and you will do yourself and the industry a disservice. Whatever schools make it to your short list, investigate fully. Ask about the course content, the instructors, facilities, etc.

You should also have a fairly extensive knowledge of and skill in handling horses, and understand the principles of horsemanship. You will also have to have a lot of or acquire business skills, as you will be running a small business with all the good and bad that that engenders. If you are not a "self-starter", then this profession is not for you. You will need to have some capital in reserve , enough to sustain you for at least one to two years. You may have to consider starting on a part-time basis and holding down another job that will provide you with income and some benefits, especially health benefits.

You may well have to relocate to either establish a practice or begin an apprenticeship. And you should know that apprentices work very hard and earn very little money, at least initially. When you go into an apprenticeship you and the master/mentor should have a clear understanding of what you can expect to learn and accomplish and what will be expected of you. You can have a verbal agreement, an informal contract, or a formal contract, but in every instance, everything should be spelled out quite clearly.

As to the comment about having a female apprentice, this sounds like someone and or their wife is really insecure. I have worked with women and have experienced no problems. My clients do not seem to have any problem with it either. I also know of other farriers who have had women work with/for them and have not had any problems.

Join and become active in your state farrier's association and the American Farriers Association. Suscribe to as many of the professional magazines as you are able. Realize that becoming a farrier is a lifelong pursuit and you can never learn too much or acquire too much skill. The early years will be lean years and most farriers who fail, do so before their fifth year in business. Know that you will have an investment of several thousands of dollars in tools, equipment and supplies, and a vehicle to use as your mobile shop.

Do not believe any hype that tells you that you will be earning big money right after you graduate from school. That falls under the P.T. Barnum branch of salesmanship.

Rick
Rick Burten PF

In the immortal words of Ron White: "But let me tell you something, folks: You can't fix S-tupid. There's not a pill you can take; there's not a class you can go to. S-tupid is forever."
."


Je pense donc je suis
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 31 Oct 2004 19:16 #3

Yeah, what Rick said! Go to one of the schools he listed( I personally went to Heartland In '97, it was worth every penny!) and worked with a good CJF for several years one to two days a week. I still work with him sometimes, though now as peers(more or less :D ). As to having a woman along, I would see no problem, 99.5 % of my clients are women. I spend far more time with "other women" than with my wife. Maybe she is okay with it because I take their money and give it to her :D ! Honestly, in any proffesion, we will be exposed to the other species, and a proffesional horseshoer will behave exactly like a proffesional in any feild towards a co-worker; with respect and decency. Period. Yes, good, close relationships will develop, but the right kind is a positve. This is a demanding and difficult undertaking, but rewarding if you are persistent, smart and willing to suffer for your art. Good luck!
Jason Maki CJF
"Always listen to the experts. They tell you what can't be done, and why. Then do it." Robert Heinlien
Jason Maki CJF, RJF
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 31 Oct 2004 19:17 #4

  • Karen B.
  • Karen B.'s Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Contributing Member
  • Posts: 57
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Thank you so much for your reply! I've applied to Cornell every year for the past three years.I've been told getting in as a female and at my age (mid 30's) is tough.I just sent a new application in yesterday so we'll see what that brings.I have quite a few tools already as I trim my own drafts.No one in the area is willing to deal with the "large ones".I have a feeling this is going to be a long road ahead.My biggest fear is finishing school and being unable to find a farrier to apprentice with.
Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented immigrant"
is like calling a drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist ".
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 31 Oct 2004 22:33 #5

  • J.H. shoeing
  • J.H. shoeing's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 1793
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: 0
Karen

I think Rick and Jason are exactly right about school. But you may have to travel to find an apprenticeship. But the travel is not necessarily a bad thing and working with multiple farriers that work in different horse disciplines is also something to think about. I would like to have worked on larger variety of horses when I was apprenticing, and spent several monthes with about 4 different Farriers that had different practices. That is just my view.

Jeff
Jeff Holder

Some people are like Slinky’s, pretty much useless but make you smile when you push them down the stairs.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 31 Oct 2004 23:06 #6

  • Karen B.
  • Karen B.'s Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Contributing Member
  • Posts: 57
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Problem is I have a husband and two kids and I don't think they would pack up and go too easily.My husband has a very good career and we just settled in on a new farm.I've been placing my horses in new homes with the anticipation of leaving for school.I am lucky in the fact that I live in Massachusetts on the border of CT. and Rhode Island so I could travel within reason to at least these three states.There is a HUGE call for people to shoe/trim draft and draft cross horses.Nobody around here will touch them.Also a good amount of people who need good balanced trims.Most of the guys around here are older and can really pick and choose who they want for clients.
Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented immigrant"
is like calling a drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist ".
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 01 Nov 2004 02:22 #7

Give Mitch Taylor a call at the Kentucky Horseshoeing School, and talk to him, I know for sure that they do a pretty good job of finding students someone to apprentice with. I would call all of the schools but I know Kentucky does that, I think Chris Gregory's school does too. That is Heartland Horseshoeing School.
good luck
Dave Purves CF
"Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects." Will Rogers

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBimQu6Pxxs
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 01 Nov 2004 02:29 #8

  • Karen B.
  • Karen B.'s Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Contributing Member
  • Posts: 57
  • Thank you received: 1
  • Karma: 0
Thanks! I'll give them a ring tomorrow.
Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented immigrant"
is like calling a drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist ".
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 02 Nov 2004 15:19 #9

  • Tom Ring
  • Tom Ring's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Member
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: 0
Karen,
It's aways away from you , however I recommend Jeff Engler's program at Walla Walla community college, they also have a 2 yr degree program.
You can have a horse shoe nail, but KNOWING what to do with it, and HOW to do it makes the difference!
Tom
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 17 Nov 2004 12:55 #10

  • vthorseshoe
  • vthorseshoe's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Master
  • Posts: 2841
  • Thank you received: 55
  • Karma: 11
Karen;
Contact John Blombach at P.O. Box 740 Westminster, Mass. 01473

John isn't far from you and would give you help and advice if someone in your area is looking for an apprentice.

John has an ad in The Eagle, <newsletter put out by Southern New England Farriers Assoc.>
Looking for Apprentice/helper/assistant to work in an established multi discipline farrier practice with concentration in Hunters and Jumpers.
Must be reliable, responsible, personable, and eager to work.
Interested parties may contact;
John Blombach CJF at 978-874-2806 or e-maikl at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

hope this helps you

p.s. SNEFA is a very good source to locate someone looking for an apprentice in your area.

Bruce
Northeast drafthorse Shoeing
"you may not like what I say" !
-but-
"you'll never have any doubts where I stand
quote Cindy Matthews 1948-2006


I thought my life had come to a close with Cindy's passing, but there is life after death Thankyou Sharon !

Bruce Matthews
Southeast...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 19 Nov 2004 12:47 #11

Karen, don't feel alone about not finding someone to let you apprentice with them. I found it was the most difficult thing to do after I got out of school and I was very worried about my income with a family and bills to pay. I did end up working for a great person and Farrier and working two part time jobs while I learned. It was also very important for me to find a school close to home, because of family and my jobs. I totaly disagree with the Farriers that told you school is not important. It is very important to go to a good school and to ride with a Farrier that knows how to teach and is open minded. There are a lot of jerks in this trade as in any trade, don't take the abuse keep putting the word out that your looking for someone the ride with, not all Farriers can communicate and teach, they may be good at the trade but lack people skills. I am always open to someone riding with me, I can't afford to pay an apprentice and cannot take responsibility if you get injured, so I may have an apprentice signe a waver, even then a Farrier is still liable for someone getting hurt. It is a huge risk having someone ride with you, but I think things can be worked out with the right person. Just like horses you can't trust them all but some of them can be trusted. As long a you or any other person realises that it is a risk and and you are a reasonable person with common sense then that reduces the risk. I think things could be worked out. I always welcome people that I can trust to ride along and learn, I know how hard it was for me and now it is time for me to give in return and it does not matter if the Farrier is male of female as long as they can be trusted and willing to work.
Phil Armitage, CF
AFA member 7480

"Anyone who proposes to do good must not expect people to roll stones out of his way, but must accept his lot calmly if they even roll a few more upon it." Albert Schweitzer
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 20 Nov 2004 03:36 #12

  • Donnie Walker
  • Donnie Walker's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Very Senior Member
  • Posts: 699
  • Thank you received: 3
  • Karma: 1
An education is of upmost importance, regardless of one's profession. Many professionals, past and present, did not attend schools for their trade, and had to learn through "TRIAL and ERROR". They will tell you this if they are of good character and have any level of integrity. They will also tell you who the victim of the "ERROR" was. Their reason for non-schooling could have been for reasons beyond their control. Don't let this stand in your way. Don't let the horse be a victim. Become a lifetime student of the "ART", not just a graduate of a basic school. It was my field of study over 40 years ago, but I did not let it end there. Attend every seminar you can locate, pre-school and post-school. It is an evoling field of science. You evidently possess that attribute or you wouldn't be inquiring now of its importance. An far as apprenticeships are concerned - "you might possibly pose a threat to the income of your peers", depending upon your geographical location, horse population, and practicing farriers in that area. Hopefully you can be located where this does not present a problem. Locate a farrier that has a large stable. Perhaps he/she will let you meet them there just to observe and ask questions prior to attending school. Let them know your intentions. Go to "www.platinumhorse.net" and obtain their soft-ware on the distal limb. Begin your studies on equine anatomy, not just of the foot, but of the whole equine, because shoeing should be a holistic procedure. Hang in there, be persistent, diligent and relentless, and good luck.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 27 Nov 2004 20:38 #13

  • shoesofiron
  • shoesofiron's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Contributing Member
  • Posts: 72
  • Karma: 0
Karen B said, "and at my age (mid 30's) is tough".

Listen, I don't want to be the one to toss cold water on a dream here, but if I can save someone some grief and heartache, it might be worth it.

Karen, I have no idea of who you are, what you're made of or anything else.
But listen to me when I tell you that if you're already in your mid 30's and haven't even started shoeing yet, then I would hope for your sake that you have the body of a tough steel worker, brick layer or something that has kept you in tip top shape for your life ALREADY.
Mid 30's. Ok, let's say you get into school today and you line up a shoer to help you right out of school (which is going to be difficult at best). IN tow or three years, you're going to be pushing 40 and still not have nearly the skills to make a full time profesion.
Your learning curve is going to be slower than someone younger because your brain synapses are already "grooved" into letting you do whatever it is you do. So learning hammer control, balance under a horse, trimming techniques are going to come slow and at a high cost of personal physical fatigue. You'll be more apt to be injured by your inexperience and inability to "feel it coming" and your healing time will be slow, making your progress toward proficiency even slower.
You ARE going to get hurt in this business, not if, but when.
Maybe you're the exception.
But I've seen several men try to learn this trade in their thirties and two of them gave me their aprons because they swore off the trade after less than 2 years trying.
One guy purchased everything he needed to make his job easier and still gave it up within a year.
Don't let anyone kid you about the strength and strain involved here. It's not for the faint of heart.
I wish you well, but if I were you, I'd re-think my plan. 35 is the very edge of the limit on taking up something like this.
20 year olds by the dozens quit because it's too tough and a LOT tougher than they thought it would be. And... it doesn't get any easier the older you get....
Sorry, had to be straight with you.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 17 Dec 2004 22:33 #14

  • hoofnhound
  • hoofnhound's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 258
  • Karma: 0
Scott,I know where you are coming from,but men forget us girls can be something to reckon with!!
I think a dose of cold water is great, it's not an undertaking to be taken on lightly but Karen,don't dispair.
If you have a healthy fierce streak and are tenacious by nature you will probabally be ok.
I got a kick out of seeing those young tough guys crumble in school. I remember one of them went on and on about being an ex-army ranger and how tough he was.
He lasted 3 weeks.

Also Scott,I think I met you? Out on the town with some other Indiana guys (+a few Kentucky) after the banquet at April's Indianapolis contest?
The administrator has disabled public write access.

RE:Schools,Apprenticing,Do's and Dont's 18 Dec 2004 03:38 #15

Thanks Scott, I feel positively decrepit now.

Are we really old in our 30's? I fully expect to see 100, so I'm thinking 30's is spring chicken phase of life!! :)

Seriously, you have a good point for those of us who are starting a bit later. It seems like it's in your thirties that you realize that your mileage is high and you have to pay more attention to the preventative maintenance.

Karen does trim her own drafts, so her body has some experience....if she can master working in stocks, that could help her even more, since she wants to work with the bigger ones. So maybe she'll be one that can get away with starting late.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Kunena Birthday Module

  • irideazippo birthday is today
  • McCutcheon969 birthday is today
  • RidingGrace birthday is today
  • trueworthy birthday is today
  • 56power65 birthday is in 1 day
  • Brenda-MI birthday is in 1 day
  • farriergodmother birthday is in 1 day
  • Jetikarabbit birthday is in 1 day
  • Myr_4089 birthday is in 1 day
  • texfarrier birthday is in 1 day
  • Pete Greig birthday is in 2 days
  • Pleasehelp birthday is in 2 days
  • UpNorthShoer birthday is in 2 days
Time to create page: 0.224 seconds

S5 Box

Register

*
*
*
*
*
*

Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required.