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11
May

P


Written by Cyber Farrier
Category: Dictionary
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P III
Third phalanx. The most distal bone in each equine limb. It is situated completely within the hoof, and resembles the hoof in basic shape. a.k.a: Coffin bone; Distal phalange; Pedal bone; Os pedis.
P III ROTATION
See: True P III rotation.
PACKING
To fill the concavity of the sole and the commissures of the frog with material that will prevent thrush and keep dirt from being trapped in the hoof while a pad is on under the shoe. The packing material may also contain various antibiotics and medications for other therapeutic uses.
PADDLING
See: Winging-out.
PADS
Leather, plastic or other materials cut to the shape of shoe, and placed between the shoe and hoof. Used for various therapeutic purposes.
PAIR
Two horseshoes or hooves. Unless otherwise specified, a pair means either both fores or both hinds.
PALLIATIVE
Affording temporary relief, but not a cure.
PALMAR
[Latin palmaris]: The palm side. This refers to the back side of the horse's fore leg. a.k.a: Volar.
PALMAR PROCESS
The rearmost portion of either side of a PIII. This is where the lateral cartilages attach to the bone.
PALPATE
To examine by touch.
PASSING GATED
Describes a horse who trots with his hind feet tracking wider than his fore feet. Not a gait as such.
PASTERN (long)
Is located between the fetlock and pastern joints and connects with the cannon bone to form the fetlock joint. The function of the long pastern is to increase flexibility of the fetlock joint.
PASTERN (short)
Is connected to the long pastern bone at the pastern joint and helps to form a column of bones from the fetlock joint into the hoof. It is also called the coronary bone.
PATHO- or PATH-
[Greek pathos]: Prefix denoting disease or suffering.
PATHOGENISIS
Origin of suffering. The generation and development of a disease.
PATHOLOGICAL
See: Therapeutic.
PATHOLOGICAL SHOEING
Shoeing to remedy a disease or injury of the foot or leg.
PATHOLOGY
Scientific study of the development and nature of disease.
PATTEN SHOE
(1) A form of bar shoe that acts as an extreme wedge shoe. a.k.a: Rest shoe. (2) Original name for what is now called a stifle shoe.
PEDAL OSTEITIS
Severe and/or repeated bruising of the sole resulting in the inflammation of the P III.
PELVIC LIMB
A hind limb.
PENETRATING CRACK
Any kind of hoof crack which exposes sensitive tissue and/or causes lameness. a.k.a: Deep crack.
PERFORANS
The deep digital flexor tendon.
PERFORATUS
The superfical digital flexor tendon.
PERI-
[Greek]: Prefix meaning around or enclosing.
PERIARTICULAR
Situated around a joint.
PERICHONDRIUM
The membranes which cover cartilages.
PERIOPLE
The thin, tough, protective covering of the coronary band. The periople normally extends less than one inch down the hoof wall.
PERIOPLE RING
Holds moisture in and dryness out; it surrounds the coronary band.
PERIOSTEUM
The fibrous membranes which cover the bones.
PERIOSTITIS
See: Exostosis.
PERITENDINITIS
See: Bowed tendon.
PETER WRIGHT
Brand of forged anvils from 1700 to 1930.
pH
A chemical scale from 0-14 used for measuring solutions with 7 as a base rating for a neutral solution, increasing with higher alkalinity, and decreasing with higher acidity.
PHALANGE
See: Phalanx.
PHALANGEAL IMBALANCE
A condition due to excessive heel growth. The P III and hoof are parallel, but not in line with the pastern. This condition can occur with club foot.
PHALANX
Any of the major bones in a digit. The plural "phalanxes" is used only for the military (non-anatomic) meaning of this word. The plural phalanges is used in anatomy.
PHOENIX
Brand of keg shoes from 1882 through 1962.
PHYSIOLOGY
The study of how the body functions.
PIGEON TOED
See: Toed-in.
PILLARS
Two imaginary lines running the entire height of the dorsal hoof wall, which are anterior points of weight-bearing. A farrier's guideline to help determine the amount of roll needed for a rolled toe. Used in Duckett's method of hoof balance.
PLAIN HORSESHOE
(1) A keg shoe with no calks or special features. Usually creased just through the nail holes. (2) A handmade shoe without any special features, calks, fullering, or creasing.
PLANTAR
[from the Latin planta, the sole of the human foot]: The back side of the horse's hind leg.
PLANTAR CUSHION
The sensitive, rubbery structure situated above the frog within the hoof. Because the word "plantar" implies the hind foot, and the cushions are common to all four hooves, they are sometimes referred to as digital cushions.
PLATER
A race horse shoer, specifically a shoer of "flat track" or Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse running horses.
PLATERS UNION
See: IUJH.
PLEXUS
[Latin]: A network of nerves or blood vessels.
POPPED ANKLE
See: Windpuff.
POPPED KNEE
Any of several forms of inflammation of the carpus. May be a bursitis, a herniated joint capsule, or a distended tendon sheath. a.k.a: Big knee; Capped knee; Hygroma.
POPPED SESAMOID
Inflammation of a proximal sesamoid bone or a sesamoidian ligament. May result from uneven stress on the fetlock, or from direct injury such as may be caused by interference. a.k.a: Sesamoiditis.
POSTERIOR
Towards or on the back of something. Opposite of anterior.
POST-LEGGED
(Horses that do not have sufficient angle to the hock or are too straight. Their hind leg resembles that of a straight up-and-down post. These horses lack flexion in the hock and tend to be rough to ride, hit the ground hard, and lack ability for collection.
POST-MORTEM
(1) After death. (2) An autopsy.
PRICK
See: Quick.
PRITCHEL
A driven tool with a tapered, rectangular shaft which is used to punch, clean out, resize, or repitch nail holes in horseshoes. When punching a new nail hole, the pritchel is used only to punch through the bottom of the hole made by the forepunch and/or creaser or fuller. The pritchel should be used when steel horseshoes are at dull red or black heat.
PROLAPSED SOLE
See: Dropped Sole.
PROLIFERATIVE
To reproduce or produce new growth or parts rapidly and repeatedly. To increase or spread at a rapid rate.
PROUD FLESH
A proliferation of granulated tissue which sometimes occurs in open wounds.
PROXIMAL
In reference to limbs, proximal means close to the torso, or comparatively closer to the torso. Opposite of distal.
PSEUDALLESCHERIA BOYDII
Microorganism implicated in some cases of onychomycosis.
PULSE (RESTING HEART RATE)
Average 44 beats per minute (23 to 70 range, influenced by age and fitness).
****** POCKET
See: Abcess.
PUTNAM
Brand of horseshoe nails from 1859 to around 1920. First successful machine-made horseshoe nails.
PYRAMIDAL DISEASE
Severe inflammation of the P III at the extensor process where the main digital extensor tendon is attached. Dorsal swelling above the coronary band and deformed hoof wall growth may occur. a.k.a: Buttress foot; Extensor process disease.