Horseshoes.com | Your One-Stop Farrier and Hoofcare Portal - Shoe and Tool Fabrication http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication Fri, 24 Nov 2017 05:33:09 +0000 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb Making Forepunches http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/350-making-forepunches http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/350-making-forepunches

Frustrated with folding and or breaking your forepunches? At wits end with their care and feeding? That's where I was on May 10 when I showed up for a hands on clinic with Roy Bloom and Dave Farley. The following is what I heard Roy say, any misinformation is mine.

Start with a length of H-13 1/2' round (available from Valley Farrier's Supply). At this point it is necessary to abandon any fear of this stuff. It's simple, not magic. Heat it up and hit it. You want to make the forepunch in three heats (not so tough if you abandon your fear). Get the piece good and yellow. Keep in mind you don't want to go to lunch while the steel is in the fire, but with an atmospheric forge, it's real hard to hurt H-13 in a few heats.

For an E nail of drift punch, bring the steel out and square it up on the horn with the flat side of your heavy hammer (Figure 1). Flip the piece over 90 degrees after every 2 or 3 blows to get a square piece going. The taper can start to show up for you in this heat. The end of the steel will get a ripple in it, do not put this back into the steel, you grind it off later. When the steel is too cool to work it will tell you, "You're beating cold iron" and it won't go anywhere. Get it good and yellow again and square it up more, remember that eventually the finished product will be slightly rectangular.

The third heat should give you your finished shape and size. With the flat side of your hammer use the top of the anvil on the far edge (fig 2). When you want to move steel in a hurry, use the horn of the anvil, as you need more finesse, move to the face of the anvil. By now, what you have should be what you want. Now you're ready to grind the final touches on your forepunch and tidy up the end.

Let it cool off and then use a chop saw to cut the forepunch to length. Too long, and the tool can be tippy, too short and it can be harder to use when making a shoe. Visualize the bar stock with the forepunch and make it suit yourself. After you cut the forepunch to length, grind a bevel and slight roundness on the hammer end (fig 3). Using the round side of your hammer on a rounded tool gives an amazingly sharper smack to your swing.

Now if you want to make a city head forepunch, the major heats are the same, except on the first heat you bring the steel out and smack that baby flat on the horn. Flip 180 degrees every two or three blows. After one heat you want figure 4. On the second heat, you shape the city head shape on the anvil top (Fig. 5), flipping the piece 180 degrees every couple blows or 90 degrees whenever things start to fold. By the third heat, you can shape up the forepunch to match your brand of city head nail. Air cool and grind the final touches.

To weld a handle on your punches, cut lengths of flat bar stock and dress them up. I used 11" of 5/16" X 3/4". Using stainless welding rod, tack the handles in place. Put the tool head in the fire and heat to a dull red. Bring it out and weld up the handle. Put the tool back in the fire and heat it up to a good yellow heat. Bring the tool out and put it in a coffee can full of wood ash or lime. Preheat the can of ash of lime on the top of your forge so it's not too cold. Let it all sit over night and you've got a forepunch. Never put it in a fire again. If it needs dressing up, grind it.

Having done all that, I used my new forepunches to make some shoes and it was glorious to get neat, clean consistent nail holes. Completely worth the effort!

making_forepunches_1 making_forepunches_2
making_forepunches_3 making_forepunches_4
making_forepunches_5

 

First published in FAWS Newsletter, Summer 1998.

]]>
horseshoes@horseshoes.com (Bob Gillanders) Shoe & Tool Fabrication Thu, 30 Jul 2009 06:39:05 +0000
Making A Fullered Shoe http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/349-making-a-fullered-shoe http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/349-making-a-fullered-shoe

fremlin_3_0

ARE YOU READY??? Relax....and have fun! It's only a horseshoe.

For this tutorial, I decided to start with a shoe in blank form, made from 5/16 ths x 3/4" stock, which is center marked. It's important to determine where to start the fullering. So, here's a method that works for me.

Prep
Shoe
Lay the shoe on the anvil, ground side up and heels facing you. Move the shoe away from you until you can barely see daylight between the inside toe crown of the shoe and the outside edge of the anvil table. Be sure that the shoe sits squre to the anvil! Now lay a straight edge over the shoe so that it lays parallel and flush to the edge of the table. (Image 1)

Using the straight edge as a guide, scribe the shoe with your fuller.

Are you ready???? Time to make a couple of marks! Make marks approximately 5/16ths of an inch from the outside edges, using the line scribed in Image 1. (Image 2)

fremlin_3_1

Image 1

fremlin_3_2

Image 2


Heat 1 Heat the branch to be fullered. Place it over the bick (horn) and bump up the ground side edge, from the mark to about 2/3rds of the branch towards the heel. (Image 3)

Here's a cross section of the branch bumped up. Notice on the photo that the upper left corner is lower than the upper right corner and the blue line shows the correct angle. (Image 4)

Now, using your fuller, mark the entire length. (Image 5)

fremlin_3_3

Image 3

fremlin_3_4

Image 4

fremlin_3_5

Image 5


Heat 2 Heat the branch again and drive the fuller down into the stock approximately 2/3rds of the thickness of the stock; a half a bite at a time. (Image 6)

Be sure to taper out towards the end of the fullering at the heel. (Image 7)

fremlin_3_6

Image 6

fremlin_3_7

Image 7


Heat 3 Heat the branch to a red heat. Approximate and punch nail holes with a botton punch. (Image 8)

Forge out any frog eyes or excessive width of stock over the bick. Make another pass with the fuller lightly!

Pritchel nail holes. (Image 9)

 

fremlin_3_8

Image 8

 

fremlin_3_9

Image 9


Repeat
Finish
Repeat the above steps on the other branch and you have a finished shoe.

fremlin_3_10

Happy Fullering!

 


Email: KFremlin@worldnet.att.net

DISCLAIMER AND WARNING: Forgery, metalsmithing, welding, blacksmithing and similar activities have INHERENT RISKS INCLUDING POTENTIAL SERIOUS INJURY TO THE PRACTITIONER AND/OR BYSTANDERS. The practitioner is responsible for ensuring adequate safety precautions (including eye protection appropriate to this type of activity) and skill, issues not covered or purported to be covered in these web pages. KEITH FREMLIN ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR INJURY TO THE PRACTIONER OR OTHERS ENGAGING IN ACTIVITIES OF FORGERY, METALSMITHING, WELDING, BLACKSMITHING OR THE LIKE AS ILLUSTRATED IN THESE WEB PAGES.
]]>
horseshoes@horseshoes.com (Keith Fremlin) Shoe & Tool Fabrication Thu, 30 Jul 2009 05:46:04 +0000
Making A Bob Punch Clip http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/348-making-a-bob-punch-clip http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/348-making-a-bob-punch-clip

fremlin_2_0

ARE YOU READY??? Relax....and have fun! It's only a horseshoe.

This method has worked for me for many years. For this tutorial I decided to draw quarter clips. I always start on the right side of the shoe first (heels pointing up). Bring the portion of shoe to be clipped to a bright yellow heat and we're ready to start.

Step #1 Place punch on the ground side of the shoe about 1/8th of an inch from the outside of the web between the 1st and 2nd nail holes. Drive the punch down until it bottoms out.

fremlin_2_1

Image 1


Step #2 Leave the punch in the shoe and drag it over to the upper left-hand corner of the hardie hole. Tip the punch at about a 45-degree angle and drive it into the corner of the hardie hole until you feel it bottom out. (Image 2)

If you turn the shoe over to the foot side there should be a bubble. (Image 3)

fremlin_2_2

Image 2

fremlin_2_3

Image 3


Step #3 With the ground side up and the heels pointing away from you, reach over the left branch and grasp the right heel with your tongs. The reins of the tongs should lay on top of the right branch somewhere around the 1st or 2ndnail holes. Lay the bubble on the edge of the anvil.

fremlin_2_4

Image 4


Step #4 Using the round side of your hammer, forge the base of the clip.

fremlin_2_5

Image 5


Step #5 Now, use the flat side. Drop your hammer handle down so that you can strike the base of the clip with the bottom face edge of the hammer. Surf's Up! Ride the wave! With a steady swing of the hammer, pull the clip slowly away. You'll notice a kind of ripple effect caused by the hammer's edge.

fremlin_2_6

Image 6


Step #6 After you have achieved the desired length of clip, raise the hammer handle so that you can smooth out all those ripples.

fremlin_2_7

Image 7


Step #7 Level the shoe around the clip. (Image 8). The foot side should be smooth so that there is no sole pressure. (Image 9)

fremlin_2_8

Image 8

fremlin_2_9

Image 9


Step #8 Place the shoe over the bick (horn) with the clip pointing toward the table. Lightly strike the base of the clip. The hammer should be striking over the top of the bick, so that the shape of the shoe is not altered. Bring the clip to the hammer by moving the shoe around the bick. (Image 10) This should give your clip the proper pitch. (Image 11)

 

fremlin_2_10

Image 10

fremlin_2_11

Image 11


Step #9 Now draw the other clip using the same steps with only two small changes. The heels of the shoe will face you this time, and you have to grasp the shoe a little differently before drawing the clip. With the ground side up and the heels pointing to the bick, reach over the branch to be clipped and grasp the opposite branch at about the 1stnail hole. The reins of the tongs should lay on top of the branch to be clipped at about the heel area.

fremlin_2_12

The finished shoe!

 

Voila! You're there!

With a little practice, you should be able to draw a clip in one heat. Maybe even two clips in one heat!

Email: KFremlin@worldnet.att.net

DISCLAIMER AND WARNING: Forgery, metalsmithing, welding, blacksmithing and similar activities have INHERENT RISKS INCLUDING POTENTIAL SERIOUS INJURY TO THE PRACTITIONER AND/OR BYSTANDERS. The practitioner is responsible for ensuring adequate safety precautions (including eye protection appropriate to this type of activity) and skill, issues not covered or purported to be covered in these web pages. KEITH FREMLIN ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR INJURY TO THE PRACTIONER OR OTHERS ENGAGING IN ACTIVITIES OF FORGERY, METALSMITHING, WELDING, BLACKSMITHING OR THE LIKE AS ILLUSTRATED IN THESE WEB PAGES.
]]>
horseshoes@horseshoes.com (Keith Fremlin) Shoe & Tool Fabrication Thu, 30 Jul 2009 03:34:31 +0000
Gas Forge Welding http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/347-gas-forge-welding http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/347-gas-forge-welding

breningstall_anvil"I went to farrier school some time back," writes Kevin McClain of Kelowna, British Columbia. "I built my own gas forge, a folding anvil stand, and most of my own tools, which are better than can be bought. I shoe only on the side, but I do make all my own shoes, either creased bar stock or concave. The shoes I make are awesome, but my forge welding is poor at best. I have used borax with limited results, and last week I bought some Sure Weld but had worse luck with it. My question is: What is your method of welding bar shoes?"

Gas welding is sometimes dubious. I use mostly torches or arc welding, but I still love forge welding (both gas and coal), because I enjoy trying to overcome all the variables that rule. Figuring out how to control the variables is hard for everyone. Weather, humidity, and how you hold your mouth all add to the variables. But you sound like a dedicated craftsman. I like that. So I'll go through gas forge welding and hope I cover something that will help you.

Your gas forge needs to get hot enough to make the steel white hot, about 2,500° F. At that temperature the surface of the steel is just at the liquid point. Don't make it any hotter, or you'll melt and burn the steel.

Both pieces must be at the same heat and free of scale. As the steel heats up, wire brush it to remove the scale. As you get to an orange heat, add flux to both pieces. A good flux can be made from borax, clean sand, and iron filings. You'll have to experiment to find the proportions that work best for you. Try one pound borax, one pound white sand, and one ounce iron filings. After adding flux, return the steel to the forge to get the white heat.

Your anvil should be pre-heated until the face is quite warm to the touch. Warm your anvil by heating a piece of steel to yellow heat and laying it on the face of the anvil. As the steel cools off the anvil will heat up.

To make bar shoes from one piece of steel, you must scarf (bevel) and overlap the ends--right-handed overlap for right handers, and left-handed for left handers. Heat the shoe and add your flux, then heat your shoe to welding heat. Bring the shoe out and place it on the anvil. Use light blows to seat the weld and then stronger blows as the weld makes. Shape the shoe as the color cools to dark red.

Well, that's my gas welding short course. Welding in a coal forge is tough, but welding in a gas forge is tougher. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. With practice you will be as proud of your welds as you are of your tools and shoes.

F. Thomas Breningstall is an AFA and MHA certified full-time farrier living in Fowlerville, Michigan. His column "Hoof & Hammer" appears regularly in RURAL HERITAGE draft-animal magazine, and is reprinted here with permission.

]]>
horseshoes@horseshoes.com (F. Thomas Breningstall) Shoe & Tool Fabrication Wed, 27 May 2009 02:32:40 +0000
Constructing A Fullered Straight Bar Shoe http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/345-constructing-a-fullered-straight-bar-shoe http://www.horseshoes.com/index.php/educational-index/articles/shoe-and-tool-fabrication/345-constructing-a-fullered-straight-bar-shoe
fremlin_1_topnew

 

There are many ways to measure a foot for a fullered straight bar shoe. This is one that works for me. This tutorial is based on using 5/16 by 3/4 inch stock.

ARE YOU READY??? Relax....As the great Bob Marshall once told me, "It's only a piece of steel. You can always cut another!"

 

Determining the length of stock using 5/16 by 3/4 inch stock. I use a soft tape measure (sewing type)

fremlin_1_meas1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Measure from one heel buttress around the toe to the other heel buttress.

fremlin_1_meas2

Subtract 2 3/4 inches.

fremlin_1_meas3

Measure and add the distance between the heels.

This length should put you in the ball park.

Marking Stock Be sure to mark your stock before starting!

Make three marks. One in the center of stock for the toe bend and a mark from each end of the stock, half the distance between the heels for the connecting bar. For example: If the distance between the heels is 2 1/4 inches, half of that is 1 1/8 inches.

fremlin_1_0Marking Stock

Heat #1

Heat two-thirds of the stock.

Bend the toe

fremlin_1_bend1
Hockey stick the first half of the bar. fremlin_1_hockey1
fremlin_1_hockey2
Scarf the end. fremlin_1_scarf1


fremlin_1_scarf2
Turn the branch.

fremlin_1_1Finished

Heat #2

fremlin_1_2

Heat remaining stock. Hockey stick second half of the bar.

fremlin_1_putscarf

Put scarfs together.

fremlin_1_flux

Flux

Heat #3

fremlin_1_weld

Place shoe in forge so that the bar is surrounded by the fire.

Bring to welding heat. Tack the weld together, brush and flux.

Heat #4 Place shoe in forge in the same manner as in Heat #3. Bring to a welding heat, place shoe over bick, bar side up. Using the round side of the hammer, strike the shoe in the location indicated by the red arrow.

fremlin_1_strike1

Pull the shoe back toward the inside of the bick and strike again in the location indicated by the red arrow. Now face the point of the bick, holding the toes of the shoe with the tongs, and place the ground side of the bar on the end of the bick. fremlin_1_strike2
Again, use the round side of the hammer and draw out the center inside edge of the bar. fremlin_1_drawout

fremlin_1_finbar

The finished bar.

Heat #5

fremlin_1_6

Heat the whole shoe evenly. Shape shoe to desired shape.

fremlin_1_7

At the toe, mark the top of the fullering. Bump up the quarters and mark for fullering.

Heat #6

Heat first branch to a bright orange-yellow heat. Then:

fremlin_1_8

Fuller branch

fremlin_1_9

Bottom punch

fremlin_1_10

Pritchel nail holes.

Heat #7 Heat remaining branch and repeat steps as in Heat #6.
Heat #8

Bring to a dull cherry red heat with fullering facing down. Brush and level shoe. Take care to forge out any sole or nail pressure.

fremlin_1_11

File off sharp edges.

Nailed and Finished... Time To Get Paid!

fremlin_1_done
With a little practice you should be able to make a pair of fullered straight bar shoes in about 35 minutes or less. REMEMBER: Don't get in a hurry. Take your time and have fun!

 

fremlin_1_12

Email: KFremlin@worldnet.att.net

DISCLAIMER AND WARNING: Forgery, metalsmithing, welding, blacksmithing and similar activities have INHERENT RISKS INCLUDING POTENTIAL SERIOUS INJURY TO THE PRACTITIONER AND/OR BYSTANDERS. The practitioner is responsible for ensuring adequate safety precautions (including eye protection appropriate to this type of activity) and skill, issues not covered or purported to be covered in these web pages. KEITH FREMLIN ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR INJURY TO THE PRACTIONER OR OTHERS ENGAGING IN ACTIVITIES OF FORGERY, METALSMITHING, WELDING, BLACKSMITHING OR THE LIKE AS ILLUSTRATED IN THESE WEB PAGES.
]]>
baron@horseshoes.com (Keith Fremlin) Shoe & Tool Fabrication Sun, 25 Jan 2009 10:13:37 +0000